Western Canadian Real Estate Prices Just Won’t Rise

Monday, December 23, 2019   /   by Sergey Korostensky

Western Canadian Real Estate Prices Just Won’t Rise

Canadian real estate prices are moving the most in over a year – which doesn’t say much. Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) data shows the price of a typical home increased in November. Most of the index gains were from markets east of Toronto, which are booming after a slow few years. The drag on the index was located exclusively West of Toronto, where markets are mostly spiraling lower.

Canadian Real Estate Prices Rise Less Than 3%

Canadian real estate prices are moving higher, driven by movements in Eastern Canada. The typical price of a home reached $638,300 in November, up 2.55% from last year. The rise in prices are coming in just a clip above inflation, which CPI printed at 2.4% in the latest numbers. Last month’s 12-month increase is also the highest observed since August 2018. Not huge growth, but the highest in a long time.

Canadian Real Estate Benchmark Change

The 12 month price in change of a typical home across Canada.
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Biggest Gains Are In Southern Ontario And Quebec

The Southern Ontario-Quebec corridor is seeing the biggest price gains from last year. Ottawa saw the biggest gains with a typical home hitting $443,500 in November, up 11.45% from last year. Montreal followed with prices hitting $380,000, up 8.72% from last year. Niagara came in third with prices hitting $431,200, up 7.99% from last year.

Canadian Real Estate Benchmark Price

The seasonally adjusted price of a typical home in Canada’s largest real estate markets.
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Western Canadian Real Estate Markets Are The Biggest Losers

The biggest drop in prices are exclusively in Western Canada. The City of Regina made the biggest drop to $260,600 in November, down 5.52% from last year. Vancouver followed with prices hitting $1,002,700, down 4.59% from last year. Fraser Valley came in third with prices at $826,900, down 3.1% from last year.

Canadian Real Estate Price Change – 1 Year

The 1 year percent change in the seasonally adjusted price of a typical home, in Canada’s largest markets.
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Most Eastern Canadian Real Estate Markets Hit New “Peaks”

Most of Canada’s large markets are now at peak prices, when they’re seasonally adjusted. Ottawa, Montreal, Niagara, Hamilton-Burlington, Toronto, Guelph, and Victoria all reached a new peak. Some segments, such as detached units, are not printing new all-time highs. Also worth a mention is many of these markets are not at all-time highs for average sales prices.

Markets Furthest From Peak Are All In Western Canada

Western Canadian real estate markets are furthest away from the peak. Regina, uh… bottom’s the list, with a typical home at  $260,600 in November, down 15.72% from peak. Edmonton follows with prices falling to $319,400, down 14.55% from peak. Calgary’s typical home price comes in third at $414,200, down 10.09% from peak. All of these markets haven’t seen peak in a few years, and were left out of the recent national price rally.

Canadian Real Estate Price Change From Peak

The percent change from seasonally adjusted peak pricing for a typical home in Canada’s largest markets.
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Canadian real estate prices are back to rising, but growth is still low as an aggregate. Breaking it down regionally, we can see that Eastern Canada is seeing prices boom. This is especially true in markets that didn’t see a big jump during the national rally – such as Ottawa and Montreal. In Western Canada, things are still mostly in the dumper – accounting for most of the drag on the index. Yes, dumper is a technical term.